Readers Response Blog

Week 2:

Image result for Holes book

Part One
Sachar, L. (1998). Holes. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Genre: Young adult fiction and adventure.

Age: 12 to 18, grades 6-12

Part Two

Response:

I loved how there were three stories intertwined and not difficult to differentiate from one another. Each story provided more and more insight to the reader about the story in the present tense. As the stories unraveled I made predictions of what I believed would happen next and could not wait to read the following chapter. Even though the book was filled with humor there were still serious issued raised about racism. For example, the killing of an African American because of a relationship he had with a Caucasian school teacher.

Craft: I think it would be interesting to have students build what they believe the camp and lake look like. Each student is unique and might imagine it differently. Students can also write down predictions of what they believe or want to happen next while reading the book.

Part Three

Critique:

The only complaint I have about the book is the ending. Even though it has a good ending it left me wanting to know more about the kissing Kate story. About all the “historical artifacts found at the camp”. Even though the camp closed down and reopened for girl scouts, It didn’t seem right that her story ended and the artifacts were not collected. I felt that it was the only loose end left. The story was entertaining and funny. Contemporary and historical are some of the themes in the contemporary realistic fiction book Holes. Even though the book is a realistic fiction, the author breaks the rules by having implausible circumstances with too many coincidences, but I believe this is what adds humor and entertainment to the book.

Part Four

Students will be asked to pull the three stories out of the book and write what they believe was the conflict, climax, and resolution. Objective: After reading the book “Holes”, students will be able to identify what the conflict, climax, and resolution was for the three stories told in the book in pairs without error. Discussion questions: Do you think Kissing Kate was a bad person? Do you believe the camp did their job, which was to build character? What would you have done if you were Stanley?

Standards:

RL.5.3
Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).
Students will choose a setting from the book to describe in great detail.

Resources:

https://www.walden.com/holes-7-creative-classroom-activities/

https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/unit-plans/teaching-content/holes-teachers-guide/

https://www.scholastic.com/teachers/activities/teaching-content/holes-flashlight-readers-activity/

Week 3:

Image result for The little house

Part 1:

Burton, V. L. (1942). The Little House. Boston: HOughton Mifflin Harcourt.

Genre: Fiction

Grade: Pre-K to 3rd

Part 2:

The Little House is a story of a well-built house in the country that after observing the country for a while begins to be curious about the city. As the city begins to expand the little house is able to see it happen until it consumes her. She then feels lonely and doesn’t like the busy city. It is not until the little house is noticed by the great, great, granddaughter of the man who built her that she is removed from the city and moved back to the country where she is finally happy again. I had no idea that the author was going to include so much industrial growth in just a few pages. It is amazing how she is able to include automobile development by showing horse carriage and then subway, cars, trains a page later. As well, as homes turned into skyscrapers.

Craft: Students could decide between the city and the country and make a collage.

Part 3:

Critique: I loved the book. The color in the illustrations really portrayed how the little house felt as the city consumed her more and more. The illustrations make the development seem like monsters that cover the sky with thick, grey fog. Even though there is vivid color in the city the cooper color of the buildings control the illustrations. I believe ethical issues are raised in the book about nature and developmental growth that causes harm like pollution. There seems to be a balance at the beginning of the book. The little house is surrounded by nature and is able to see the seasonal changes in her surrounding, moon phases, stars, and children playing. Yet, when she is surrounded by the city there is too much light pollution to see the stars, she can’t tell when the seasons are changing, the people seem extremely busy and in a hurry. It seems that there is not any balance, and even though there is more technological advances it does not seem to be making people happy from her point of view because she doesn’t see any enjoyment.

Part 4:

Students will work in groups to cut out pictures out of magazines of items that could represent the country and city and paste them onto construction paper. Objective: After reading the book, The Little House, students will be able to sort images of country life and city life in groups and describe how the little house felt in each situation with 100% accuracy.

Discussion questions: Where would you like to live in the city or country and why? How old do yo think the house was to be able to see all the industrial growth? If your house could talk what do you think it would say about its surroundings?

Standards: RL.2.3 Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.

RL.2.3
Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges

 

Week: 4

Image result for when my name was keoko

Part One

Park, L. S. (2002). When My Name Was Keoko. New York: Recorded Books.
    1. Genre: young adult fiction
    2. Grade Level: 4-7

  Part Two

    1. Response:

      1. Predictions: I didn’t know what to expect from the book. It seemed as a lot of sad things happened throughout it so when Sun Hee’s brother was thought to be dead the only thoughts I had were “If it’s a children’ book he can’t really be dead”.
      2. Thoughts about craft: I thought it would be a fun idea to put together a newspaper since Sun Hee’s uncle had a printing shop. The newspaper could piece together main event of the book or even go further and have factual information about Korea during the Japanese war.
      3. Thoughts about particular issues raised in the book: I know every country is different and they all have different traditions, but it seemed very sad how the women in this book were treated. During the war both men and women were treated horribly. An scene I can’t forget is when an elder lady did not know how to say the number six in Japanese and was hit because she said it in Korean.

  Part Three

    1. Critique: The style of writing is amazing. The author tells the story from two points of view. The sister and brother alternate each chapter. This provides more insight to the situations that are occurring.The story is written in a time when the Japanese have taken over Korea and are attempting to eliminate their culture. The Korean people are “asked” to change their names to Japanese names. There is a war happening and this book lets its audience see how war affects the people who are at home and not physically involved in battle. A lot of the culture and traditions are seen in the story. I felt as if I understood the culture better and it is amazing how courageous the characters were.

  Part Four

      1. Lesson Sketch based on the book that includes a lesson: Students could write about traditions the Kim family had throughout the book and find an image go to with it with each tradition or custom.
      2. objective: After reading the book, “When My Name was Keoko” students will form groups and be able to identify Korean customs or traditions and look for imagine to go with each custom with 100% accuracy.
      3. Discussion questions: Which characters showed courage in this story? How did they show it? What do you think Sun Hee means by “ you burn the paper butnot the words”? What did you learn about Korea and Japan?
      4. a standards:
        W.5.1
        Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information
        RL.5.3
        Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text
        (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or action
      5. RI.5.5
        Compare and contrast the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution)
        of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts

       

      Resources: https://sites.google.com/a/eths202.org/ms-williamson-s-humanities class/assignments/when-my-name-was-keoko-project

      https://multcolib.org/when-my-name-was-keoko

      https://www.echo-korea.org/jml/workshops/9-activities/news/27-book-review-with-questions-when-my-name-was-keoko

Week: 5

Image result for The Friends yumoto

Part 1:

Yumoto, K., & Hirano, C. (2005). The friends. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux.

Grades: 5th to 8th

Genre: Fiction

Part Two

Response:

  1. Prediction: Toward the end of the book when everyone was at their happiest, I expected the old man to have passed away when the boys returned from their soccer camp. I did not expect the boys to actually find the man dead. I had thought the boys would have seen him at the funeral, not actually find him in his home dead. I also didn’t expect the boys to get that close to the body. They tried to feed the old man a grape, hoping he would wake up.
  2.  Craft: Recreating what the old man’s house looked like. Students can decide if they want to create it as it was when it was cluttered or clean.
  3. Thoughts about particular issues raised in the book: The question of what happens after someone dies is thrown around frequently. I think that death could be a sensitive subject in some households and religious beliefs sometimes answers the question about death. I think it is important to share with students as well as parents that the book doesn’t push a religious belief on the students, but rather helps them see how the boys cope with the death of a friend. The three friends learn  and grow up around each other and the old man makes a huge impact in their lives. It is not until the end of the book that the three friends reference the old man a lot and learn to live without him.

Part Three

Critique: The story takes place in Japan where three friends find the time to build an unexpected friendship. The friends are fascinated by the idea of seeing a dead person after one of them shared his experience of his grandmother’s funeral. All three begin to watch an old man in the neighborhood waiting for him to die to put an end to their curiosity. Unexpectedly, the friends begin to form a friendship with the old man and a lot of change begins to happen for them as well as the old man. I believe the themes in the book are death, friendship, and age. Most of the story is placed in a small neighborhood in Japan.

Part Four

  1. Lesson Sketch: Through their journey of the friendship the three boys develop with the elderly man, the boys are able to find their identity and be comfortable with themselves. By knowing more about the elderly man’s life the boys were inspired to live their lives to the fullest and try their best. An activity the students can do is ask their family questions and themselves. For example, What are their hobbies? What do you hope to do in the future? Objective: By the end of the week students will collect data from their family members and themselves and come up with a conclusion of who they are and will work individually with 100% accuracy.
  2. Discussion questions: Why do you think the old man’s lifestyle changed when he met the boys? Do you notice any differences in the culture portrayed in the book that is similar or different to your own? Are you curious of death?
  3. a standards:
    W.5.1
    Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
  4. Resources:
    https://www.tolerance.org/classroom-resources/tolerance-lessons/discovering-my-identity

https://www.facinghistory.org/resource-library/identity-and-community/who-am-i

https://www.tolerance.org/classroom-resources/tolerance-lessons/discovering-my-identity

Week: 6

Image result for the bridge to terabithia book

Part One:

    1. Paterson, K. (1977). Bridge to Terabithia. Thomas Y. Crowell.
      2. Genre: Young adult fiction 
      3. Grade and age: 9- 12, 5th-7th grade

  Part Two:

  1. Response:

I didn’t expect Leslie to die in the story. I thought yes something tragic does need to happen but I guess I didn’t really want it to happen. It was a great story. I loved the friendship that Leslie and Jess formed. They were both lonely and found sanctuary in the kingdom of Terabithia.

Craft: The teacher can provide a passage from the book for the students to use their imagination and draw what they see.

  Part Three

    1. Critique of the book: The central theme of the book is friendship. Jess feels lonely in his home and school and Leslie feels the same at time because she is new student and her parents work a lot as writers. They become great friends and to cope with their struggles they build their imaginary kingdom. Jess builds courage through his imaginary kingdom which helps him face the tragedy of the loss of his friend.

  Part Four

    1. Lesson Sketch based on the book that includes a lesson objective: In this activity, the class is divided into groups. The groups will be given multiple passages where they must identify whether the passage is foreshadowing or a flashback. Objective: By the end of the lesson students will be able to identity foreshadowing or a flashback in the passages provided as a group with 100% accuracy.
    2. 2-3 discussion questions based on the book:How do you think Jess will live his life differently because of his friendship with Leslie?, Why is running so important to Jess?Why do Jess and Leslie create Terabithia? What does Terabithia represent for them?
    3. a standards:CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.9-10.5
      Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
    4. 3 links to outside resources: https://www.walden.com/bridge-to-terabithia-7-creative-classroom-activities/, https://www.varsitytutors.com/englishteacher/bridge-to-terabithia-lesson-plans,  http://www.learner.org/workshops/isonovel/teacherslessonplans/MollerPage.html

 Week: 7

Amulet: The StoneKeeper

Part One

    1. Kibuishi, K. (2008). Amulet: The Stonekeeper. New York, NY: Graphix.
    2. Genre:  Science Fiction and adventure, Age: 9-12

  Part Two

    1. Response to the book including one or more of the following:
      1. Predictions: The book is intended for young readers and foreshadows a lot in the first book. It was visible from the first couple of pages that something bad would probably happen.
      2. Thoughts about craft: I think it would be interesting to have students put together their own short graphic novel or comic strip. I also thought it would be a good idea to let the students work in groups to rearrange certain imagines from the book.

  Part Three

    1. Since the book is part of a series, the story doesn’t quite end in the first book. There is not a happy ending, but is left to be continued. It is a graphic novel and the illustrations really match the text. There is more illustrations than words in some of the pages but the readers can definitely see what is happening without any text. The story I believe can be easily relatable for students since it describes two ordinary children that are school age.  The plot makes a good story that students would be interested. The two young children have to go through a magical world to save their mother from a monster. Considering that they lost their father, the two children are willing to do anything to save their mother. I think the message the author is trying to send to the readers is to not give up. The story mostly takes place in their grandfather’s home.

  Part Four

    1. Lesson Sketch based on the book: I would give the students a prompt that allows them to express their opinion and also analyze a character. If you could turn back time what would you change? In the book the character is told that she will have the power to turn back time. What does this character value? Support your answer using the text. Objective: Students given a prompt and  asked to analyze and share their opinion in written form.
    2. Discussion questions: Do you think she did the right thing by accepting the Amulet’s power? Could there have saved their mother a different way? Why do you think she was chosen by her grandfather? How would you use the power?
    3. a standards: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.9  CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1
    4. at least 3 links: http://www.scholastic.com/graphix_teacher/pdf/Scholastic_GrphxWebCast_KKibuishi.pdf
      http://www.graphicclassroom.org/2008/05/amulet-stonekeeper.html https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Search:the%20amulet

Week: 8

Image result for the perks of being a wallflower book cover

The Perks on being a Wall Flower

Part One

  1. Chbosky, S. (2012). The Perks of Being a Wallflower. S.l.: BookCaps.
  2. Genre: Fiction, Grade Level: 10-12

  Part Two

    1. Response:
      1. Thoughts about craft: Make a quote journal while reading the book. Make a mixed tape. Students could respond to a letter written from the book that the teacher has previously picked out.

  Part Three

    1. The book is about a freshmen in high school that has lost his friend to a suicide. Charlie, who is extremely upset about his friend is considered a outsider. His English teacher sees Charlie’s potential and assigns him extra books to read and eventually becomes his friend. Charlie meets new friends that are seniors which later on appreciate who he is as he become more confident in himself. Theme in the book include friendship, suicide, sexuality, abortion, drug use, and sexual abuse. The story is told through a series of letters that Charlie sends to a friend. This friend is said to be a good person because he or she didn’t take advantage of a person during a party. Charlie does not say who the letter are too.

  Part Four

    1. Lesson Sketch: Students will trace Charlie’s character development as he becomes more comfortable in his identity. Objective: Students will independently cite the text to support their findings in analyzing the character to answer the prompt provided with 100% accuracy over the course of a week.
    2. 2-3 discussion questions: What makes up one’s identity? What does growing up mean? How do stereotypes affect character identity?
    3. a standards-based lesson activity:CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.11-12.1
    4. 3 links to outside resources:https://selfdiscoveryinart.weebly.com/daily-lesson-plans.html, https://www.prestwickhouse.com/blog/post/2019/02/how-to-teach-the-perks-of-being-a-wallflower, https://www.englishcaddy.org/wallflower.htm

Week 9

The Quest for the Tree Kangaroo: An Expedition to the Cloud Forest of New Guinea

 

 

 

 

Part One

    1. Montgomery, S. (2009). Quest for the Tree Kangaroo An Expedition to the Cloud Forest of New Guinea. Boston, NY: Houghton Mifflin.
    2. Genre: Science Non-fiction/ informational and suggested age: 10-14

  Part Two

    1. Response
      1. Predictions: At the beginning of the book it talks about the lead scientist not seeing a tree Kangaroo in the wild in about 7 years, so I expected them to have a great experience with the tree Kangaroos. Also, when they spot their first tree kangaroo and it falls on its back attempting to jump, I assumed the tree kangaroo was probably injured.
      2. Thoughts about craft: Before showing the students what a tree kangaroo actually looks like, I would use the descriptive words from the book to verbally paint a picture for them and have the interpret those words into a drawing.

  Part Three

    1. The book is full of factual information from the expedition to New Guinea. The book discusses all the people on the trip and every detail from what they needed to pack to how they observed the tree kangaroos. The information text was extremely detailed, which makes the reader feel as if they are participating in the expedition. It provided background from every person helping on the journey. Even though the book is about the tree kangaroo, every part of the expedition was important. The natives that help and their language are discussed in the book and examples of pronunciation of words and sentences are in the back of the book. There are also tips on what students can to help wildlife. The text is descriptive and vivid and the images in the book add to it.

  Part Four

    1. Lesson Sketch: Research an animal and find out where they live, if their home is danger, how many are left, and how you can help to preserve them. Objective: Each student will work independently to research an animal and answer the questions provided with 100% accuracy in one week.
    2. 2-3 discussion questions: How can you help the tree Kangaroo? Have you seen a tree Kangaroo? What do you think of the work these scientist do?
    3. a standards-based: W.5.1aIntroduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose
    4. Resources:http://www.sciencemeetsadventure.com/pdfs/scientistinthefieldguide_questfortreekang.pdf https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Search:the%20quest%20for%20the%20tree%20kangaroo https://sites.google.com/a/lpssonline.com/mrs-pitre-s-fifth-grade-class/reading/unit-2/quest-for-the-tree-kangaroo

 

 

 

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